Day 7: Hexacopter Demo, Stereotype Threat, and Meeting Jackrabbot

The morning began with breakfast with Professor Mykel Kochenderfer, Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and director of Stanford Intelligent Systems Laboratory (SISL). Kochenderfer talked about everything from balancing work in academia and time spent with family to his interest in flying planes as a teenager, which ultimately influenced his work today.

kochenderfer breakfast
Prof. Kochenderfer shares a personal anecdote on college life at Stanford University.

Following breakfast, Prof. Kochenderfer led a lecture on intelligent decision making under uncertainty, particularly in the case of collision avoidance. Aware of the limitations within the current TCAS system, Kochenderfer’s research led to the creation of the Airborne Collision Avoidance System (ACAS X). Campers learned all about the models and algorithms powering ACAS X, such as Markov Decision Processes (MDP) and dynamic programming, which collectively make planes safer.kochenderfer lecture

Prof. Kochenderfer’s PhD students, Rachael Tompa and Louis Dressel, then led a tutorial on the effects of tweaking parameters on PID controllers, which regulate systems as simple as thermostats at home!

The campers then embarked on a trip to Lake Lagunita for a demo on hexacopters. The girls learned the effects of tweaking the proportional and derivative parameters on the stability of the drones.

ananya drone
Campers tweaking parameters of the PID controller to smooth the sharp jolts and turns of the hexacopter.

In the afternoon, the campers engaged in a personal growth session on combating stereotype threat with Gregg Muragishi, a PhD student at the Department of Psychology of Stanford University. Muragishi emphasized the importance of developing a growth mindset, especially in times of overcoming the “culture of genius” surrounding workplaces and institutions alike.

crumpled paper
Activity: Campers pouring their frustration with challenges onto a piece of paper.

After the personal growth activities, the campers were met with a surprise visit from Jackrabbot, a new-generation social robot. Created in the Computational Vision and Geometry Lab at Stanford University, Jackrabbot was designed to learn how to mingle among humans in crowded spaces while following proper etiquette. When asked about the possible applications social robots like Jackrabbot could have on society, the girls mentioned everything from making traffic more efficient at train stations to assisting the blind!

jackrabbot raise hands
Campers volunteer to demonstrate the instinctive social behaviors that Jackrabbot observes and learns.
jackrabbot hat hand
Campers follow the gaze of Jackrabbot, which has its eye on the moving chair and maneuvers accordingly.

The day concluded with campers continuing their research in their respective projects, which include assisting with disaster relief using natural language processing, decoding DNA to find meaning in the genome, making hospitals safer with computer vision, and predicting the future of personal transportation with self-driving cars. As the days count down to final presentation day, some campers have already started making plans for creating poster boards and discussing the skeleton of their talk!

Advertisements